Tips for students with learning differences - MetroFamily Magazine
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Tips for students with learning differences

If you’re like most Oklahomans, you’re at home wondering what to do with your children now that the Oklahoma State Department of Education has closed schools for the remainder of the academic term. Many schools launched their version of remote learning curriculum and parents are now taking on a bigger role in their child’s teaching experience. For parents with children that learn differently – especially those dealing with dyslexia, autism, ADHD, dysgraphia, dyscalculia, and auditory/sensory processing issues – students that are out of their daily routine can quickly become stressful and challenging.

The National Center for Learning Disabilities estimates that one in five children in the United States have learning differences, meaning many parents are working with an individualized education plan (IEP) and trying to implement a unique curriculum from home. distance learning, dyslexia, autism and ADHDFor children with learning disabilities, minimizing over-stimulation and maintaining routine are keys to success.

Trinity School at Edgemere is the only private school in the OKC metro that for almost a decade has solely provided research-based methods that help students with learning differences reach their fullest potentials. When the recommendations for social distancing were implemented by the CDC and Oklahoma Governor, the school launched a Remote Learning Program based on Google Suite Technology that includes live teaching by teachers and interventionalists.

Based on their years of experience, Trinity has a few key recommendations for parents to help ease students back into a frame of mind for learning:

  1. Virtual school starts at a specific time, just like typical school. When you decide on a time, stick with it and don’t be late!
  2. Encourage your children to sit at a flat work surface, table or desk with their iPad and WiFi connection to the internet while in class. No lounging in chairs or on the couch!
  3. For younger students, assistance may be needed to navigate the technology.
  4. Be patient! This is new and will take some time to figure out!

Acknowledging that times and routines have changed also allows parents to interact and teach their children in distance learning, dyslexia, autism and ADHDnew ways. Learning through free exploration allows families to become closer and more aware of what types of activities interest their children. Trinity has several kid-friendly activity suggestions, plus you can check out some of our other free resources. Discuss with your children which ones they would like to try. Even though we know it might seem hard at first, we believe “You Got This!”

Trinity School at Edgemere is the only private school in the OKC metro that for almost a decade has solely provided research-based methods that help students with learning differences including dyslexia, autism and ADHD reach their fullest potentials. 

For more family-focused resources on distance learning, check out the perspectives from local moms

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